Category: Media

What can the microbes on your chair tell us about the indoor microbiome?

What sorts of bacteria did we find in a university classroom? from BioBE Center on Vimeo.

Funny you should ask! A new BioBE study is out today in the journal Microbiome. We sampled the bacteria from surfaces all over a university classroom and found that the bacteria on those surfaces can tell you quite a bit about how we interact with those surfaces. We also made a quick film that discusses our results.

Media coverage of PLoS Lillis Dust paper

Here’s a list of all the media coverage on the recent release of the Lillis Dust paper as compiled by James Meadow. There are some really interesting write-ups that tie together some ideas from previous work out of the BioBE Center and related labs.

Original articles:

Articles dispersing the UOregon press release or the above original articles:

BioBE: a ‘Creative Remix’

Eric Berlow and Sean Gourley’s recent TED talk entitled “Mapping ideas worth spreading” discusses their application of ecological networks to demonstrate how the catalog of 24,000 TED talks are connected globally. Around minute 5:15 in the video, they begin to talk about how to discover some of the most ‘creative and interesting’ ideas by finding talks that explore a ‘creative remix’ of fields — for example, genetics and cities. Jessica Green’s TEDxPortland talk and other built environment related talks are held up as prime examples of this innovation.

Jessica at RWJF

Jessica recently paid a visit to the folks at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to talk about how we can utilize our growing understanding of the built environment microbiome to build healthier, more sustainable buildings. Watch her “What’s Next Health” interview and check out her guest blog post. Also, hidden under the video is a nice infographic about her vision for the future.

Hidden Dangers in the Air We Breathe


Berkeley Lab researchers work on new building standards after discovering previously unknown indoor air pollutants.

“Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) made the discovery that the aggregate health consequences of poor indoor air quality are as significant as those from all traffic accidents or infectious diseases in the United States. One major source of indoor pollutants in the home is cooking.”

See the article here.