AAAS Meeting on Microbiomes of the Built Environment

Last week a AAAS meeting on the Microbiomes of the Built Environment was held to bring together leaders in the field to discuss existing knowledge and future directions. Jessica Green participated in the panel video above and the whole meeting is available online.

You can also check out the Storify of tweets during the meeting created by Jonathan Eisen.

BioBE Animation of the BEMicrobiome

Here’s the latest animation of the built environment microbiome created by the BioBE Center with Cameron Slayden (Cosmocyte) and funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The video can be used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

2 BioBE Positions Available

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We have two positions available at the BioBE Center.  If you know of awesome candidates or places to spread the word, please do so!

Information about the positions, located at the University of Oregon (recently rated by livability.com as one of the top 10 “Best Places to Live”) are below.

Bioinformatics/Microbial Ecology postdoctoral position (for application details go here)

Jessica Green and Brendan Bohannan are currently seeking a bioinformatics postdoctoral researcher to explore fundamental questions in microbial ecology and evolution.  Applicants should have a PhD with extensive training using bioinformatics to understand the ecology and/or evolution of complex biological communities, and strong writing skills.  The ideal candidate will have experience developing and applying quantitative community and population ecological methods to the analysis of environmental sequence data and next-generation sequence data.

The successful candidate will play a key role in the Biology and Built Environment (BioBE) Center (http://biobe.uoregon.edu/), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.  The BioBE Center is training a new generation of innovators to study the built environment microbiome – the diversity of indoor microbial life, their genetic elements and their interactions.  The vision of this national research center is to understand buildings as complex ecosystems and to explore how architectural design mediates urban microbial ecology and evolution.  For a description of partner projects see http://www.microbe.net/.

Microbial Ecology Research Tech position (for application details go here)

The Institute of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Oregon currently has an opening for a full time Research Assistant to work in the area of microbial ecology.  The successful candidate will play a key role in the Biology and Built Environment (BioBE) Center (http://biobe.uoregon.edu/), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.  The BioBE Center is training a new generation of innovators to study the built environment microbiome – the diversity of indoor microbial life, their genetic elements and their interactions. The vision of this national research center is to understand buildings as complex ecosystems and to explore how architectural design mediates urban microbial ecology and evolution. For a description of partner projects see http://www.microbe.net/.

Extensive experience using molecular techniques is required, including some combination of skills in DNA/RNA extraction, PCR, cloning, next-generation DNA sequencing, bioinformatics, and phylogenetic analysis.  Ability to work in a team atmosphere is a must.  A Master’s degree in biology is desirable, but individuals with a bachelor in biology or related field and extensive experience are also encouraged to apply.  The successful candidate will be responsible for conducting laboratory research under the direction of Jessica Green and Brendan Bohannan.

Can bioinformed design promote healthy indoor ecosystems?

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An editorial in the journal Indoor Air from Jessica Green is out today. Jessica describes her vision for incorporating biological insight into architectural design decisions, what she calls “bioinformed design”. In the article, she lays out the arguments for why she believes this is the future of building design and how bioinformed design will shape healthier buildings in the future.

What can the microbes on your chair tell us about the indoor microbiome?

What sorts of bacteria did we find in a university classroom? from BioBE Center on Vimeo.

Funny you should ask! A new BioBE study is out today in the journal Microbiome. We sampled the bacteria from surfaces all over a university classroom and found that the bacteria on those surfaces can tell you quite a bit about how we interact with those surfaces. We also made a quick film that discusses our results.

Media coverage of PLoS Lillis Dust paper

Here’s a list of all the media coverage on the recent release of the Lillis Dust paper as compiled by James Meadow. There are some really interesting write-ups that tie together some ideas from previous work out of the BioBE Center and related labs.

Original articles:

Articles dispersing the UOregon press release or the above original articles: